ANV Teaching Resources > Lesson PlanCatawba Deerskin Map

CATAWBA DEERSKIN MAP (1721)

Topic: Deerskin Trade
Grade Level: 8th
CatawbaFull_DeerskinMapImage

Introduction

What can an examination of the Catawba Deerskin Map tell us about relationships between European colonizers and Native peoples in the Carolinas? In this lesson, students will analyze primary and secondary sources to examine the economic and political relationship between Native peoples and European colonizers in the 18th century.

Learning Objective

Given an escape room activity and graphic organizer, students will analyze primary and secondary sources (Catawba Deerskin map), in order to examine the economic and political relationship between Native peoples and European colonizers.
Who was the “winner” in the Deerskin Trade?
In what ways can trade generate economic autonomy?
What was the relationship between European colonizers and Native peoples? What degree of independence and autonomy did Native peoples have from Europeans? What is the significance of the Deerskin Trade to Indigenous-European relations?

8th grade: I.1.3, 8.B.1.2, 8.C&G.1.4, 8.E.1.3, 8.G.1.3, 8.H.1.2
(see https://www.dpi.nc.gov/media/11819/open)

Materials

Per group: 4 manilla envelopes containing materials for Parts 1-4
Lesson may use digital platforms such as Google Jamboard, Canvas, or Nearpod, but not required. https://blogs.loc.gov/maps/2016/11/celebrating-native-american-cartography-the-catawba-deerskin-map/
Key Concepts (e.g., main ideas, important understandings)
Deerskin trade helped produce economic and political autonomy for Indigenous peoples in the region. Indigenous peoples actually had a great deal of autonomy (e.g., not victims or controlled/marginalized by Europeans). Ontologies of maps…
Key Vocabulary (important vocabulary, academic language)
Deerskin, Autonomy, Unprecedented, Political power
Key Content (e.g., Events/People/Places)
Deerskin Trade, Catawba Deerskin Map, Catawba Nation, Charleston, SC, Carolina colony, Virginia, Francis Nicholson
Description

In this lesson, students will be organized into teams to move from station to station gathering information through note taking and engaging in various activities. Students may be assigned to work in small groups of 2-3 or they may be allowed to work independently, but each “group” should move from station to station as a unit for pacing purposes.

Teaching Procedures
Teaching Method: Escape Room. For this lesson, students will be given 3-5 clues to solve using the provided primary and secondary sources within each “clue” envelope. The answer to each clue will show them a different piece of the puzzle. Upon completion of all clues, students will answer the compelling question based on the gathered information.
Instructional Strategies
small group organization: escape room, map analysis with graphic organizer

Introductory Activity

As a bell ringer, students will be asked, What does it mean to win? Students will post an individual response in a discussion board. Teacher will share selected responses/ask 3-4 students to verbally share their thoughts. Through a brief whole class discussion, the class will determine 2-3 conditions of what it means to “win.” (Note: Be sure to limit this discussion to no more than 5 minutes).
Suggested discussion board options:
Google Jamboard, Nearpod Collaborate Board, Canvas Discussion Post.
Suggested conditions:
economic, political, and social advantage: making more money, getting the “better end of a deal,” political power, higher social standing

Steps

Students should be organized in groups of no more than five depending on class size.

Segment A (Parts 1-3) – Escape Room

  1. The teacher will hand out each envelope as it corresponds to each part.
  2. Once students have completed Part 1 students will receive Part 2 and so on.
  3. Before you begin the escape room, you will need to put a timer on the smart board. Depending on the amount of time you have for your classes will determine which timer to use.
  4. Ex: https://youtu.be/UiS9LMziSt8

Part 1:

  1. The teacher will pass out the first envelope. In this envelope the teacher will need to include the escape room narrative, the secondary source: Period overview Negotiating Autonomy and Dependency – 1730 to 1750, and the first cipher labeled Pigpen/Masonic Cipher with instructions on how to use the cipher.
  2. Once all envelopes for Part 1 have been handed out, the teacher will begin the timer.
  3. Students will use the “Pigpen/Masonic Cipher” to decode 8 questions related to the secondary source. These questions will reveal the main ideas and purpose of the deer skin trade. The first letter of each answer will be used for Part 2.

Part 2:

  1. As each group finishes Part 1, the teacher will pass out the second envelope. In this envelope the teacher will need to include Polybius Square Cipher to decode the “code word” from Part 1 and instructions on how to use the cipher.
  2. As students continue to work, the teacher will walk around ensuring that all students are participating. Remember, each group member is responsible for writing down all questions and answers on a separate sheet of paper.

Part 3:

  1. As each group finishes Part 2, the teacher will pass out the third envelope. In this envelope the teacher will need to include the instructions on how to use the “Vigenere Cipher”, and the Vigenere Cipher to decode the “code word” from Part 2. You will also need to include the secondary source: Period overview Negotiating Autonomy and Dependency – 1730 to 1750.
  2. Using the “code word” DEERSKIN from Part 2, students will follow the instructions on the “Vigenere Cipher” to decode a question.
  3. The question will be: “What year did the deer skin trade begin”?
  4. Students will use the secondary source provided to answer the question which will be the code word to give the teacher. Answer = 1670.
  5. Once the student group has given the teacher an answer of 1670, the group will move on to Segment B and receive another envelope.
  6. The teacher will need to include cut up puzzle pieces of the Catawba Deerskin Map with instructions of what to do with the puzzle pieces.

Segment B (Part 4) – Catawba Deerskin Map & Analysis

  1. The teacher will hand out to each group member who has completed the map puzzle a graphic organizer with specific instructions.
  2. As a group the students will complete the graphic organizer. The teacher will assign specific group roles for teams of four to six.
    • Suggested roles: leader/manager, timekeeper (may be combined with leader role), reader/researcher (up to 2), recorder, presenter
  3. Students will answer a set number of questions within the graphic organizer.
  4. Closure: Cite evidence to support claim (CQ). On a class discussion board, have students generate an original claim in response to the compelling question, citing evidence AND then respond to a peer dis/agreeing with evidence (max 2 responses per claim).
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